Two Ruins, Two Lessons

Two sets of ancient ruins—the graceful temple columns rising against the backdrop of shimmering desert sands in honor of the Mesopotamian god Bel, and a Persian mountain fortress containing a possible Zoroastrian fire altar—these disparate places, one in modern Syria and one in northern Afghanistan, reveal two sides of modern archaeology: the allure of beautiful and exotic locations that connect us to the past and the dangers archaeologists face while digging in the midst of wars and conflict.

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Travels in the Ancient Worlds of Greece and Rome

Here are two travel memories. One, a comical, pastoral memory starring an ancient spring, an irate shepherd and two college girls. The second an inspirational memory from a first visit to the Acropolis in Athens. But perhaps these can’t compete with Francis Rocca’s lyrical article describing the joys of visiting the Roman Forum, a place “Where the Ancient Past is Palpably Present”.

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Rethinking “Us vs. Them” the Ancient Greek and Roman Way

Classics professor emeritus, Erich S. Gruen, offers hope that we can overcome our ingrained impulse toward demonizing the “other” through his analysis of Greek, Roman, and Jewish thought in his new book, Rethinking the Other in Antiquity. His argument is briefly laid out in a commentary from the Chronicle of Higher Education.

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