Review of A Lesson in Secrets by Jacqueline Winspear

Jacqueline Winspear fans won’t need any prodding to read her latest Maisie Dobbs mystery, A Lesson in Secrets. The rest of you should be ashamed of yourselves. Maisie’s character makes for uncommonly good reading as she takes a new direction professionally, working undercover for the Secret Service in the midst of the conflicting political currents of 1932.

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Review of Roman Games by Bruce Macbain

Bruce Macbain’s Roman Games launches an excellent new Roman mystery series. If you are a fan of Steven Saylor, Lindsey Davis, or Roman history in general, you’ll want to pick it up. His detective, Plinius Secundus (Pliny the Younger), a decent, straight-laced senator, teams up with Martial, a poet of racy and scurrilous verses, to untangle a delightfully twisted murder case.

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Review of The Curse-Maker, by Kelli Stanley

The Curse-Maker, by Kelli Stanley, set in Bath during the Roman period, blends a twisting, exciting mystery with a vivid Roman setting. Stanley combines her background as a classicist with a passion for noir mystery. The Roman politics and corruption that provide the context of the mystery are compellingly developed and, like many things Roman, echo modern life while retaining their uniquely Latin flavor. click the title to read the full review…

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Review of Murder Your Darlings by J.J. Murphy

J.J. Murphy’s Murder Your Darlings is a thoroughly delightful read. Part screwball comedy, part literary spoof, this mystery stars Dorothy Parker, William Faulkner, Robert Benchley and others solving a murder when a prominent drama critic is found stabbed with a fountain pen under the famous Round Table at the Algonquin Hotel. Don’t be put off if you’ve never heard of the Algonquin Round Table—Murphy supplies whatever background you need, and you don’t have to have read Parker to catch her rapid fire humor. Fans of Jacqueline Winspear will enjoy this light take on the same period.

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