Weekly Roundup of Archaeology and History November 6-10

My weekly round up of history and archaeology (with a little humor thrown in this week): Emily Wilson’s translation of the Odyssey brings a woman’s smart view to the ancient poem, making medicines at the Palace of Ebla, exquisite warriors carved on a Mycenaean seal from the Griffin Grave and canine noir cartoon for the mystery & dog lovers

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Weekly Roundup of Archaeology and History September 23-October 13

Here is my roundup of archaeology and history: Variations on the myths of Ishtar, the original goddess of love and war and a mysterious Luwian tablet, now translated, tells of a Trojan prince and his naval battle with Ashkelon, and I include photos from Madrid’s National Archaeology Museum’s extraordinary collection

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Weekly Roundup of Archaeology and History Sept 9-15

My weekly roundup of history and archaeology: a list of best book review blogs, newly discovered Egyptian tomb of a goldsmith, K├╝ltepe’s 23,000 clay tablets of early Anatolian writing, 7,000 yr old ceramic storage silo model reveals economic power in Jordan Valley, and a new, pretty amazing Mycenaean rock cut chamber tomb with untouched remains and grave goods.

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Weekly Roundup of Archaeology, History and Historical Fiction July 8-14

My weekly roundup of posts from around the web: Pompeii renovations open the house of mysteries and other buildings, the secrets of Roman cement’s longevity, virtual unrolling of burned Pompeii scrolls, Hippocrates text found in Egypt’s St. Catherine’s monastery and Aztec skull towers contained women and children–blowing standard theory.

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Weekly Roundup of Archaeology, History and Historical Fiction March 4-10

Here is my weekly roundup of posts I enjoyed: carved statues from Chinese mythology, trying to assess and fix damage to archaeology from armed conflict, ancient use of mind altering plants and fermented drinks, and a cool rock cut underground labyrinth that is probably a 19th C fantasy by some rich guy, but is falsely attributed to the Knights Templar

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Weekly Roundup of Archaeology, History and Historical Fiction Feb 25-March 3

My weekly roundup of posts I enjoyed: third gender in the ancient Near East, Roman luxury baths in France, Marylee MacDonald’s literary fiction, AIA lecture on ISIS and crowdsourcing cyber archaeology, discovery of a huge unexpected Roman gate in Israel

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